Skip to main content

About your Search

Book TV 89
English 89
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 89
. as america stood on the edge of american leadership, europe entered a decade in which it convinced itself war was impossible. the book, grand illusion, captured the view that europeans were too advanced, too sophisticated to fight each other. john maynard keynes a code this with his famous observation about how the world was tied together, how an englishman could order from his doorstep products from faraway lands and have them delivered to him. it's kind of an early version of thomas friedman's theory which claims an advanced country that used computers won't go to war with each other. i call it the starbucks to pick any two countries that have starbucks won't fight. you know, i guess unless they have like a triple espresso to another observer, in a much different way, posited that war would be so bloody and weaponry so deadly that no one would dare risk a conflict. all of these assume that european leaders would be rational, a stretch even in the present day. this, of course, vanished in august 1914, a war sparked by one of the most unlikely of accident when ferdinand on his way back from s
, is that we are at a true juncture. are we going to go the way of western europe or the exceptional capabilities which attract entrepreneurs for over 200 years and this is why the huge growth of government is not about numbers of gdp. it creates dependence rather than independence. it does your sense of ability to solve problems. surgery of the free markets are sensible rules of the load and creativity, get a chance to get ahead and get these ever widening circles of cooperation, breaking down barriers and enabling people to realize their dreams or do we have the same for your bread into custody and wait for the government to rise in the street like you see in europe. worse at dynamism going to come from? yes its trust to verify, but you get the rise of the internet. they get richer and deeper. and enable people to do more. that doesn't come from government. that comes from what the opportunity, with the problem, how do we solve it? this way steve jobs touched such a chord when he died late last year is precisely people sense. this is living by james had hoped 10 but anyone which th
ago here as opposed to the countries of western europe, we were the most egalitarian of countries. now we are the least. we have outstripped everybody else because our capitalism has been a relatively robust. when capitalism can do it's thing, it polarizes. when it polarizes it creates an awareness that is probably also occur to you. if a growing number of people i'm having a hard time and a shrinking number of people are collecting enormous wealth, it will occur to the two of them that this is happening. and in the one group there may develop their resentment against the of a group. and if you have a system like capitalism coexisting cannot that you have to, but if you have a system of capitalism coexisting with the democratic society in which everybody has the throne and the following in sight is going to occur to a lot of people. we, the majority, are really getting screwed in the economy. the way to fix it to reverse it, to offset is to use the political system to get the result. in the political system weekend rearranged so that what we lost in the economics as it became more and
and focus on just one section about demands on the burke that in europe. quince not very long ago americans and europeans pride themselves on religious toleration and understanding. and animosity and violence including such bloody episodes as the wars of religion, including as well be quieter violence of colonial religious domination by europeans in many parts of the world and added to that, domestic anti-semitism and anti catholicism and culminating in the horrors of nazism which implicated not only germany but many other nations as well. europe and the u.s. until recently liked to think these dark times were in the past and religious violence was somewhere else, in societies more allegedly primitive, less characterized by heritage of christian values. today we have many reasons to doubt that. our situation calls urgently for critical self examination as we try to uncover the roots of ugly fears and suspicions that currently disfigure all western democracies. in april of 2011 a lot affect in france according to which it is illegal to cover the face in any public space from march to marketp
of eastern europe now has flat tax is. in all these countries, revenues have boomed. there hasn't been a big craze this is anime and estonia. this in a past and estonia with 12% flat tax. the fact is supply-side economics is booming around the world. it's only in the united states that soul-searching and from this economics of enterprise. >> what is your analysis of what is happening in what donald rumsfeld recalled old europe? >> old europe is fallen with the indulgent dilutions of the welfare state. they've all accepted dependence on a show i've government and bass have destroyed the value of their assets. when you destroy the value of your assets, ultimately the human beings who make your economy go our investments and creations of work after. when you'd appreciate this asset, reliability is become impossible. if you unleashed the assets of your economy, allows the stock market to boom and thread began, then all of a sudden these liabilities they seem impossible today become manageable in the future. >> george gilder, when you see the fight in congress over the debt ceiling or tax breaks
let between innovators coming from central europe and those coming from the plateau which has fostered a suspicious negotiation and character they can see right of into the politics in bucharest to this day and i can go to every country, not every but many countries and talk about but. >> talk for a moment about germany. one of the images germany has natural boundaries to the north and south with the alps and further burden the east and the west is flat plains, so germany had a war over the century with germany or france or that area and poland and because germany was a continental power sandwiched between the maritime europe on one hand and the heartland towards the other it was always problematic which we it would go and how it would develop. i can across this book by accident in early 1989. the berlin fall with -- berlin wall would fall but november. it had occurred to me after reading this book and other books that the berlin wall or the dividing line between eastern and western germany was one. creation of german history that would reinvested soften different territory always in t
and india where there's a big social agenda, you have a different form. anyone europe, southern europe, northern europe, different forms, but in northern europe, the informed capitalism, where the government believes in strong social safety net, believes in paying for health care, believes in playing a role in determining what businesses grow or fail, and they're creating more jobs than we are. so we have to be careful when we, as we sometimes do in the united states, get up on our high horse and say we understand capitalism. actually what's going on in the world is a competition between different versions, and if our version produces more inequality, produces less growth, it's -- is seen as less fair and others are seep as more fair and producing growth, who do you think is going to win that arguement? >> host: a lot of people say the northern european countries, norway, sweden, et cetera, is socialists. is socialism a term that is outdated? >> guest: i think it is. let's take an example. car companies going bankrupt during the last cycle. america, big capitalist country, doesn't have
is that with 18 months of kosciuszko's death this will was contested by three different parties, in europe, one within the united states at the time, when that surface three different subsequent wills that had been drawn up in europe, and so i don't quite understand, and in jefferson -- at this point he said this is going to really fall into a lot of litigation. he said i think it's going to go past my lifetime. he was right. and so he resigned as executor, and sure enough, this litigation continued. finally, wound up in supreme court. it was resolved in 1852 in favor of the polish descendents your this is 26 years after jefferson's death. so what i'm confused about is how did he ever have that money in front of him? the money was in the u.s. treasury in washington, and he never had access to it. and after that date it was tied up in the courts. so how could he have used this money to free slaves? and how did he have that option of no, i'm going to back off of this, i don't want to free my slaves. i'm really confused as to how he ever had access to those funds. >> the will end up in litigation
of the meeting point between europe and asia. and has always developed, was developed as a center of trade and commerce. that continued, of course throughout the centuries into the 20th century, and made it what it is in terms of its trade, in terms of its trade potential. now, it's also larger than the capital, damascus, not by much but it's a very large city. it's not just the second city. so has been a place where many traders and manufacturers as well preferred because it was historically quite a vibrant or because it was far away from the center where they might have a bit more freedom, even though that margin of freedom was not wide. >> where are you from originally? >> i am lebanese, but my mother is sick and spent an lebanon supported history, correct? >> right spent is there a lot of trade between lebanon -- how would you describe lebanon's economy? >> it's going to take up to saturday because the lebanese economy is really very difficult to describe the nominally it's an open capitalist economy, but the kinds of networks and crony network, that exist in lebanon, turned this kind
on that project, the making of a global capitalism and then even as it helps europe and japan revive, the question is, how does is keep reducing? because now you're creating your own competitors. >> at one point in your book to speak but the american empire, actually dramatic appoints. tucker added as imperialism by invitation. you want to talk to the lead of such a mean by that. >> it's actually a phrase that a sweet story and used for 1945. but it is largely not -- it's a matter of saying that the pentagon in the cna have, in fact, not been essential to the role the american state has played in the world as the treasury and the federal reserve have been. and that term empire which was coined for the way in which decapolis class of europe after 1945 facing strongly and much more concerning labour movements , the socialist threat that they posed, and they were concerned about a soviet invasion. turn to the american state to look to the american state to reconstruct a capitalistic. and in that sense it was empire building. when multinational corporations, the conditions by the late 1950's were foun
the atlantic between them. he would go off to europe in the spring and summer with a party of friends and travel around, often--sometimes he would take one of his daughters, and then later, he would take a mistress. and when he came back from europe, he would send his wife abroad in the fall and winter with one of their daughters and a chauffeur and a paid companion. so pretty much, they lived separate lives after about 1880. c-span: did they ever divorce? >> guest: no. divorce was really not an option in that world. some people did, but it was very scandalous and shocking. and interestingly enough, it was always--the women were--it was more disruptive for the woman. women were objects of scandal, even if they had done nothing wrong. and a couple of the people the morgans knew who d--women who did get divorced, moved to europe, just because it was a much more accepting, forgiving society. and also, i think, in professional terms, morgan was a conservative banker with a reputation for integrity. divorce didn't figure into that picture. c-span: this picture right here is of which woman
side relies on faith, and our side, especially in europe, seems to rely on materialism. this was a struggle of the human soul, chambers wrote, but we often seem to believe that the answer to islamism is simply more employment opportunities for saudi youth. we're, this a sense, in a position that we criticize the chinese leadership for having, but even here on the islamic question, chambers had interesting things to say. he wrote, quote, "the difference between liberalism and communism was in degree only." this question arose in the previous panel. continuing" they put faith in man rather than god and shared a common world view." there is a lesson here. chambers held we could not fight communism, bask with its near relation, liberalism. if 4e were alive, i think he would say we cannot fight extreme sharing a world view with it, namely, non-violent islamist extremism. if that's obvious to you, it's not been obvious to many governments around the world. the government of the united kingdom that spent a decade asking and promoting what it saw as nonviolent islamist extremis
for weapon and mean. when he saw the pentagon estimate that the red army could overrun europe in two weeks, he wrote in the margin, i doubt. it took us three months just to take this on. when the spending request came in, ike would say i know those boys down at the pentagon. ike believed the real national security came from a sound economy. he was a deficit hawk. he controlled government spending and package. his famous speech warning against military-industrial complex came at the end of his presidency but, in fact, he been working on it all a long. mostly behind the scenes. heaven help us, he liked to say, that we'll get a president who knows less about the military than i do. this approach to the military was not just about the economy. in the berlin crisis in 58-59 and in early crisis with korea and vietnam in 1953, 54, the almost straight, the suez crisis in 1956, eisenhower was playing a bigger game for higher stakes. a west point cadet and a young army officer, ike had been a great poker player. indeed, he was so good that he had to give it up. he was taking too much money from his
, and liberation of europe. ike smoked four packs a day as a general, quit cold turkey in 1949. he gave himself an order to quit, he said. he had a heart attack in 1955, and operation in 1956, a small stroke in 1957, doctors worried about the blood pressure and ordering him to worry less. what do they they the job is, he said? he tried to relax playing golf. he played 800 times as president, a record, but golf was the wrong game for a perfectionist. he was grim on the course, and once through a chipping wedge at a doctor, howard snyder, when snyder tried to make him feel better about a shot from the bunker. he had a tumper. his mother would quote the bible saying he the conquer their own soul is greater than he who takes a city. ike would say his mother taught him how to control the temper. one of the aids said i thought what a poor job she had done. [laughter] when he was mad, he was like tearing into a steel furnace said an aide. he had trouble sleeping, and towards the end, took too many sleeping pills and an extra drink of too, worn out in the end, and looked it in 1960. ike, old golf playi
they are developing. in southern europe, northern europe or different forms, in northern europe, the government believes in a strong social safety nets, believe in paying for health care, believe in playing a role in determining what businesses succeed or fail and yet those governments have budgets that are balanced and growing faster than we are and creating more jobs than we are. we have to be a little bit careful when we as we sometimes do in the united states that are high horse and say we understand capitalism, actually what is going on in the world is a competition between different versions and if our version produces more in the quality and less growth is seen as less fair, and others are seen as more fair and are producing more growth, who do you think is going to win that argument? >> host: a lot of people would say the northern european countries are socialist. is socialism a term that is outdated? >> guest: i think it is. let's take an example that is big in the election campaign. car companies going bankrupt during the last cycle, america is the big capitalist country didn't have a
. the seven years war changed the map of the world shifting national borders in europe, in africa, in india, and elsewhere. it leveled thousands of towns and villages in europe. killed or maimed more than a million soldiers and civilians, and bankrupted a dozen nations including england and france. remember, it started in britain's north american colonies, and the british government and british people naturally thought british subjects in british north america should share the costs of the war with their fellow citizens in britain. in fact, the government raised property taxes so high in britain that farmers rioted in protest and demanded that americans pay their fair share of the war. in 17 # 64, the british government extended to the colonies a stamp tax that everyone in britain had been paying for more than 70 years. it amounted to next to nothing for the average citizen, a pepny or two or a stamp attached to legal documents, publications, and the packages of non-essential products like playing cards. the harshest effects of this tax, however, were on members of three powerful special in
at that and said, you know, this is not too dissimilar from where europe was in the early 1970s. europe grew at about our rate after world war ii. we were pretty much in line until the early to mid '70s, and then all of a sudden they took a significant step down and never caught back up. and they were on a lower growth trajectory. they had taken a ten down and were on a lowerrer growth trajectory. so year after year after year that gulf between us and europe got wider. it's now about 40%. that's a pretty significant gap. we're looking at, you know, just to get back to lucas' chart, we're looking at the beginning of that for us. and we say if we don't get back to ha growth, we could look at -- to that growth, we could look at europe and say that's our future. and since we have the ability to look at what's happening around the world, we can say that's not the future we want. and nothing concentrates the mind like a crisis. or like people being unemployed. i would say 8% unemployment is a crisis in this country. and, you know, i think what you'll see in washington after the politics is done in
't export to europe. but instead of talking about that, he lashed out an audience that was almost all jewish, he lashed out on him and he said you are a must stop making interest of the lead to a hitler from the great dictator, as he stopped making and a german, and i hit local antinazi films, you are going to cause the next war millions of american boys aren't bickel and blood will be spilled and will be the worst outbreak of anti-semitism that this world has ever seen because everybody is going to win a remedy in this country is going to blame the jews. by 1940 he was a total absolute praia nobody wanted to touch him. nobody could join the first immunity and sign up with lynn burba but he didn't want to do that because he knew that if he did that, there would be no place in politics for his children ever, ever, ever. so he didn't. he stayed quiet. the marrec was part of the stories, the part i'm not going to be able to tell you the you will have to read in 1940 he was the kennedy name was dirty. it was dirt among the isolationists because kennedy didn't come out against roosevelt. again be
recognize its independence, which put tremendous pressure on europe to intervene in favor of the confederate. the european statesmen at the beginning of 1862, considered the unions caused to be hopeless. quote it is the highest degree likely that the north will not be able to subdue the south. british prime minister lord pomerance and told us for an officers. meanwhile, the lincoln government appeared overwhelmed. congress and the white house were in the hands of a political party that it never government before. the treasury department was broke. federal spending was multiplied as never before. in 1862, the u.s. government spent six times as much money as it spent in 1861. and where would it come from? northern banks, and an economic panic had closed their exchange windows in late december, refusing to redeem paper money. meanwhile, rebel soldiers menace washington from nearby manassas virginia where they had routed the union army a few months earlier. confederate artillery they atomic river above and below the n. no one in civilian authority, not even lincoln, had any detailed knowledge of
century, beginning of the 14th century, venice is one of the biggest cities in europe, one of the biggest and richest and that's kind of remarkable because if you've ever been there, it's such a crummy place. rd, mosquito bitten, lagoons, very hard to build are the only reason italians ended up babies because they chased them off the good land. so yours is incredibly rich, incredibly powerful state, sending its trade mission to china, controlling creeks, lands along the croatian coast, controlling my inspiring to the italian and land. how did they do it? to the nations of this fabulous right we can still taste today, where the liquor in her to probably the most innovative and economic system at that time. they have a particular form of contract system, which allowed. unusually if you were a person willing to take on risk. even if you didn't have capital, you could share in a deal with the partner who did have capital: a trading nation in the guy who didn't have capital, but he raced his life took a share of the profits. this really was the reason you have this huge market title vicar and
of detail. i tried hard. i knew a lot of people in ben gadhafiments city, officials here, and then in europe, and they relied on local sources. the -- and the whole issue of how the united states became motivated to get involved is interesting, and, again, i go back to the issue of intelligence and what people didn't know about libya and what assumptions people were making. you know, it seemed like washington, between the the white house and state department, everybody had an idea of what should be done, advocatings on both sides, a ready group of the individuals, the power, and given rise to those looking for an opportunity to implement a responsibility to protect scenario that would succeed so that's a whole, you know, that's a whole section, again, as to what -- how did we come to intervene, and why was that actually a good idea? the next question, of course, is the one that everybody's talking about now, which i'll leave teem for questions, which is where is libya headed next? you know, with regards to what happens this benghazi, i think one needs to take -- regardless of all of the chao
company held. they been thought through the rest of europe. and as they fought through europe, the next place they were at was a place called brett. there was a coastal fort, a major port. allies needed to resupply their forces. they needed a harbor. the only problem was there was another gun position. and like pointe du hoc, it was a suicide mission. something called the locust battery. the locust battery had massive battleship sized guns that were buried mostly the entire fortress buried underground. picture a four-story building, fortress, that had been buried underground. there were elevators going down this thing. .. >> the men described to me how the shells came over like freight trains. the shells could destroy an spire hedge row, a small mound of earth, and bury men alive. and that's exactly what happened. they fought for several weeks many this place -- in this place x then what's amazing is a small team of four men led by lieutenant bob evland, they were known as the fabulous father. the fabulous four found a bunker and a small path that had been worn out. it looked like it ha
of films. the film come is going to do if they could export to europe. but instead of talking about that, she lashed out at an audience that is almost all jewish. he lashed out at them and say stop making anti-hitler films. unless you stop taking anti-german, anti-hitler, anti-nazi films, you're going to cause the next work. boys are going to be killed, blood will be spilled and there'll be the worst outbreak of anti-semitism in this world ever seen because everybody is going to blame everybody in this country is going to blame the jew's. by 1940, he was a total absolute pariah. nobody wanted to touch him. if you wanted, he could have a chilling the america first community, signed up with lindbergh. but he didn't want to do that because he knew if he did that there'd be no place in politics for his children at her,, ever. so he stayed quiet. there are actually as part of the story is the part that i'm not going to be that tell you, that you're going to have to read. [laughter] in 1940, he was a kennedy name is in the dirt. it is dirt among the isolationists for kennedy to comment against
. onion lots of people, officials here and in europe, it relied on local folk sources. -- and the whole issue of how the united states became motivated to get involved is interesting. you know, again, i go back to the issue of intelligence and what people did know about would be and what assumptions people are making. it seemed like washington, everybody had a different idea of what should be done, and there were advocates on both sides, are ready group of individuals who wanted to up look for an opportunity to implement irresponsible protect some area that would succeed. so that is the whole section. this section again as to the how we came to intervene and why that was actually good idea. the next question, of course, is the one everyone is talking about now on which will leave more for questions. where is libya headed next. you know, i think with regard to what happened in and gusty, it is still -- i think everyone needs to take, regardless of all the chaos that is happening, step back, go up several thousand feet and looked at this process over a much longer not the time. we are sti
and if we want to make progress to cut unemployment benefits and things like that the war in europe and united states began preparing. we have our military buildup it would increase 20% 27 million jobs right now. it turns out there wasn't enough spending in the economy they could and should have been spending more on the government and thanks to the method it's the same thing right now. there is overwhelming contribution that this is the time having the government spend more would be freed, putting people to work with the unemployed that would be basically doing nothing and essentially it is very easy and very hard politically because it is hard to persuade people about the need to do that which is why some of us books. [laughter] >> some of those would argue it's like a sugar pill for the transient work of time and then you fell back. i think it's a very interesting story. why did little more to, why didn't we strike back in the depression? in fact there was montgomery ward was a major kept waiting for the depression to comeback basically lost their position in the marketplace. it
ronald reagan's decision in 1983 to station medium-range misfiles in europe to counter the soviet buildup of similar misfiles on its side of the dividing line between its domain and the west. massive protests were planned here at home and all over the world with the biggest one scheduled for the aid to which over a million people from every country in western europe was streaming by plane, bus, and on foot. the cover of the dutch broadcasters had erected a respite overlooking the square to which the protesters were all marching. they invited pundits from various european countries to sit there and comment on this great event. evidently, however, there were unable to find anyone in the whole of europe willing or able to support reagan's decision, which is why i received a panicky call at the last minute, inviting me to participate. so desperate were they test bicep their decision -- their discussion with an affirmative action fascist, role i often played in the days, that they even offered to fly me over on the monstrously expensive concord. and so came about that a few hours later i found
because of logistical problems, because of strategic priority, as i say europe first, china second, it was pretty low. one very good indicator was our -- [inaudible] you. over 60% is commonwealth countries. somewhere among 25 went to soviet union. during the entire war, less than 2% went to china. so you see, china was very important, but in terms of material support was very small. that was very ironic. has lot to do with rivalry, policy, priorities, logistical difficulties. but overall it's national policy, very important. the time he of course doesn't work the chinese way because americans don't decide to go back to asia. >> how many chinese died during world war ii? >> the numbers vary. the most accepted number during the seven years, eight years of war, remember world war ii lasted a lot longer in china, was 15 million. >> 15 million? >> 50 million. >> that's on par or close to what the soviet union lost? >> soviet union lost more. anymore concentrated way because stalin -- german policy and eastern front, the other area. >> japan lost -- >> most of these 50 million casualties
and the greenback. and boasted in one day she made $200,000 europe was booming minks were giving easy money at low interest rate and prices were rising and they were buying the bonds because they pay high interest rates. but the prices are so high they reached a level where nobody could afford them they could not buy the bonds of day with some of them. 80 percent was on by the europeans. then they went into bankruptcy and the bank had to close. know more customers for the railroad bond edberg and hetty had to come back to america. this city had burgeoned with tense story buildings central part stretch north and a brownstone houses replaced the shanties and apartment houses appeared for the first time. the largest bookstore in the world, patrick's touched this guy the metropolitan museum of art opened in the museum of natural history. the exuberant spending was no different from the unfettered expansion from industrial on to procurers, promoters and real estate speculators. from 1873 the financial panic flat and the country into despair. does that sound familiar? and the stocks bounced up and down.
that is bursting now increase. or maybe that's bursting in spain. other countries in europe think back two or three years ago. was just as broke as it is today. yet they were able to borrow money and they paid a lower interest rates and everything was fine. it wasn't fine. it's just the bond holders were asleep. they were oblivious to the circumstances. and eventually they woke up and they demanded a higher rate of interest to compensate for the risk of holding the paper and now the government can't afford a higher interest rate, and now people realize that so they want their money back. so now there is a crisis. the only reason that we can service our debt is because the rate is so low. we can't be pay our debt. that's not even possible. all we can do is service the debt but of course once our creditors realize we can't, then they are going to want their money back and we can't pay it back. we can print it but then it isn't going to be worth very much. the key is going to be when are the creditors going to wake up and demand a rate of return on the dollar's? because right now the rate is zero and
century europe. for them the past is not a dry affair but full of exciting people brave he rose and events that could teach us a great deal about our own time. here we decide to concentrate to make a history of the kennedy administration accessible to the widest audience in the hope the treasures of the kennedy library will inspire people today the same way those of the past inspired my parents brought a 50 anniversary of my father's inauguration. with a digital archive putting them on line so people all over the world could have access. so that kids could learn about the most important moments and reach translated into more than 40 languages. this is a combination of digitizing an amended tag the partnerships to make is the first presidential archive, a digital presidential archive. then my mother's oral histories seven -- seven conversations of have been sealed since 1964 and to commemorate the cuban missile crisis we publish a book called "listening in" the secret white house recordings of john f. kennedy." president kennedy takes to do 65 hours of meetings, conversations are private di
in europe in june 1940? >> the war had started in september 1939, peter, and germany had overrun poland. hitler's idea at this point was to invade france and knock britain out of the war thereby. with the intent later on to invade the soviet union. he hated communism. this is one thing that was really part of his agenda. he was actually going to invade france in the wintertime, ma in november-december. he had to put that off because -- spent of 1939? >> of 1939. because of the invasion plans fell into the hands of the french and the british, soy put off the invasion until may, and he came up with a new plan. the old plant actually had been similar to world war i. it was going to come through belgium, along the channel coast, and down into paris. but he had to completely rearrange that, and he came up with you do, one of his generals, to think through belgium, but send the majority of these armored power through the our danforth further south and coming behind any french and british armies that went into belgium once the war started. and this worked perfectly, beginning may 10 of 1940ยป
for the rest of europe. as they fought for europe the next place they were at was breast which was there was a coastal port, a major fortification, the allies needed to resupply their forces and needed the harbor. the only problem was there was another gun issue. like pointe du hoc it was a suicide mission. the battery, the grass battery, as many people called it, had massive battle should sized guns that were buried most of the entire fortress was buried underground, picture kind of a four story building fortress that had been buried underground. there were elevator's going down, there was an entire hospital, mess hall, everything. to the naked eye, you look across a farmer's field and all you see is a tiny little pillbox, that was the battery and for months the men of "dog company" tried to find that battery and take it. that was their objective. the guns were devastating. they fought on hill's 63 in the men described to me how the shells came over like freight trains. the shells could destroy an entire hedgerow, small mound of earth and barry men alive and that is exactly wh
bookstore maintains the same price. i actually think it kept booksellers in business throughout europe and kept publishers in business throughout europe and provided riders -- >> one of the things really imagining at the moment, it constantly streams up the post -- [talking over each other] >> google and microsoft wanted to get rid of copyright but how can you sustain riders? they can't live on freeze. some of them can. >> partially why we are here. >> i you -- [talking over each other] >> the national endowment and humanities, the attitude to providing finance, publishing and books by copyright. >> we certainly -- for the people that produce literature, the people that produce history, perspectives. we are not in the business of making a llaw and we have an instinct -- supporting the concept of copyright and whether they should last 85 years or longer and what kind of access to digital capacities exist for books that are not being sold.
devastated by annihilation and holocaust in europe. so this book is about israel's political culture. and it's most pointedly a biography of a modern sparta, the story of a military society and a powerful defense establishment, a ruling elite who have found it very difficult over the decades to engage in the processes of peace and who have enter a warrior kind of ethos that overpowers every other institution in national life. the ruling elite in israel is not a large class. there have been only ten prime ministers since david men giewr onif you do the double counting, and so it is possible to introduce them as characters in a group biography, and that is what i've tried to do. we must always remind ourselves in looking at any nation's history that all politics is local. and in israel during the first decade of statehood, the pioneer spirit began to flag when israelis were short of water, short of good agricultural base, and when the bright sheen of ben-gurion's leadership began to fade because young people were will hess and less interested in pursuing military service as a career than they
time so she takes her daughter on a tour on a ship in the tour europe. it gives her time to conflict -- contemplate. what happens is cleveland mrs. his love interest so he writes a bunch of love letters. he sent an agent of his homage vote out to intercept france's fulsome heading to europe and they deliver all these love letters. what happens is the love letters become public. they become public. people are fascinated with cleveland's romance but cleveland is kind of off the hook because in his love letters frances, probably like a lot of you, he he calls her nicknames in and terms of endearment, cupcake, pumpkin, whatever. many people in the press think that cleveland is trying to court the widow who is only a few years his junior and they don't realize it's frances. what happens is people are getting smart to do so as frances comes back from her european tour, the widow goes to the harbor report in new york but cleveland sends a ship to get frances, kind of like a swashbuckling johnnie depp movie, she climbs on the side of the ship and she gets on the presence boat and unbeknownst
companies going to do if they couldn't export, right, to europe? but instead of talking about that, he lashed out at an audience that was almost all jewish. he lashed out at them, and he said you guys unless you stop making anti-hitler films, the great dictator -- charlie chaplin's great dictator -- unless you stop making anti-german, anti-hitler, anti-nazi films, you are going to cause the next war. millions of american boys are going to be killed, blood will be spilled, and there will be the worst outbreak of anti-semitism this world has ever seen because everybody is going to blame everybody in this country is going to blame the jews. by 1940 he was a total, absolute pariah. nobody wanted to touch him. if he had wanted, he could have joined the american first community, you know, and signed up with lindbergh with, but he didn't want to do that, because he knew if he did that, there'd be no place in politics for his children ever, ever, ever. so he didn't. he stayed quiet. the miraculous part of the story is the part that i'm not going to be able to tell you, that you're going to hav
popular surge. >> eastern europe after the war, it's a black hole, actually in european history, very few people know very much about it. one of the points of writing the book was to put together both work people have done in other langes and also to use archives and interviews to tell a story that hasn't been very well told. how it is communism took over the region, how is it done. >> how quickly after the end of world war ii did the iron curtain, communist take over europe? >> it actually happened quite fast in the sense that when he red army came into the region, they were already prepared. they didn't know how long it was going to take and didn't have a ten-point plan but they began trying to control key institutions from the beginning, including the secret police, and also the radio and various -- other parts of the society they considered important. that one from from '44 or '45. >> where were the strongest areas of resistance? >> probably in poland. there was an armed resistance, the partisans, who were operating from the woods, particularly in eastern poland, and they were -- >> l
'll close with this. we have a -- a different form of government than they have in europe. this is not a parliamentary system. if you're in a parliamentary system, one government rules everything. it's one party rules hav. you have the speaker -- the equivalent of the speaker -- and the leader all in one party. and then you don't compromise, you put that out there and you get your program through. if there's a lack of confidence, the people can change parties. the next party comes in and does what it wants. that is not what we do here. sometimes i wish it was the form of government we had because at least there would be some action and you would know what to expect and you wouldn't have this uncertainty. because each party has its dreams, its hopes, its plans. and they would have the chance to get those policies through. we don't have that here.we have to meet each other halfway. because the house is run by the republicans and it will be next time. the senate is run by the democrats but it is not a supermajority. we have to deal with our colleag
these situations and maybe you won a tour europe and go off in one of those from places but they allow. i is really fun i had the kids during halloween completely surprise them and hear the kids at halloween their super cute. it was a conversation starter and i told the guys i was filming them in their costumes. you could also take still pictures as well and here's one of my favorites we can go ahead marlo and those are one of those moments 21 have a little bit of fun just think about it for your doctor's office to combine it for your elderly mom or dad. my folks are constantly atc13 doctor's office these days as she was overwhelmed by the amount of information she was receiving from the family doctor. this is a perfect gift idea gift and for teenagers to mention students my cousin is only 19 years old and he's a boy so i do not really know what they're into and so when i did was caught him a and and i am a hero now and here is ep was ordered him this pencam are. . >>host: you do not need an extra cable even disreputable ticket to goand teenagers are tough to shop but they will absolutely love th
been critical to the passage through europe. whatever the private feelings. they saved their criticism for french in to china. where they claimed to encounter racism on parallel. they routinely stayed at branches of the ymca, the equivalent for the grown men of boy scouts and cheered on by enclaves of indians who instituted the south asian over most of the globe. a consequence empire and kind of -- a different and similar manifestation of internationalism supported them in this clutch of circumnavigators. the international and support him on the later surfaced tour of the world. he came from a privileged russian family. that was of no help when he found himself on the losing side in the russian civil war during that revolution. as a white russian stranded stranded in china he was a man without a country. so destitute he made his way to shanghai, overhand and a mix of men and women in cast off slothing. he obtained a passport. a document that the league of nations had begun to issue to stateless refugees initially russians in 1922, a first step in the development of international refuge
problem, a crisis in europe, this ongoing crisis in europe, could have a significant impact that could very easily send us back. so this last financial crisis, u.s. on ground. we could take all the credit for it here, but that does not mean that the next crisis can start elsewhere. the history of financial crisis, that would not be the first time trouble in the 1990's coming of asia, russia. so we have double the ability to international shock that could bring the crisis on him even if we are in export of that part of the financial crisis. >> host: thank you for holding you're on book tv on c-span2. >> caller: are you uremia okay? >> host: we are listening. please go ahead, sir. >> caller: first off, i just realized i got neal's but from the library. i was on hold for six weeks. it's a popular book. my question as to why he mentioned that he is a democrat. his high level, i wonder how the place. is it important? as he does his work, is it on his forehead, oh, he is a democrat. what geithner deferred to him as opposed to republican? how does that play at that very high level of politics
the intellectual life and breakthroughs of the enlightenment in europe and scotland and apply them in many ways to american politics. self-government was only going to work in jefferson's mind if the people who were governing themselves knew themselves, cared about each other because why would you sacrifice with someone for whom you had no common interest, and you could find that your individual rights and your individual being had come from nature or god and therefore couldn't be taking away from the hand of a king or the hands of a mob in the this is the moment that he embodies. its hierarchical moment to be alive in that very hour, a hugely important so here you have jefferson who could kill a fly when he needs to and who could think of the most fundamental way when he needs to. one hell of a combination. what i wanted to do in revisiting jefferson obviously was try to restore him to his context as a politician partly because i think politics gets too bad of a wrap these days. it may deserve a city bad rap but i don't want to be overly optimistic. we don't have any other way to govern oursel
of contagion, a problem in europe, this ongoing crisis in europe could have a significant impact that could very easily send out a signal that it is a crisis. this last crisis is homegrown. but that doesn't mean that the next crisis cancer elsewhere. the financial crisis would be the first time. so we have that vulnerability and international shock that can bring a crisis home here. >> host: charles in gilroy, california. you on booktv on c-span2. what is your question for neil barofsky? >> caller: hello, are you hearing the okay? >> host: please go ahead, sir. we are listening. >> caller: i just realized that i got neil barofsky's book. i was on hold from the libraries for like six weeks. it's a popular book. the question is he mentioned that he is a democrat. at his high-level, i wonder how does that play. is it as important as he does his work? is it on his warhead that he is a democrat. would timothy geithner defer to him as opposed to a republican? how does that pedigree play at the very high-level of politics? >> well, i would say the only time it really benefited me in any way shape
hear about the army firing one of our most effective division commanders in europe in our first your of war there, and that's really the they had that began the book for me, going back and studying this. bob kill brew told me, tom, you need to learn more about george marshall, so off i went. a couple years later i emerged from the archives. really came to admire the guy. i don't think he's a particularly likable guy. and the other hero, i think, in my book is eisenhower. i think he's actually underrated. the job of managing the allies, of dealing with the british, the french -- >> montgomery was no easy character. >> montgomery's a piece of work. [laughter] you know, at one point they're meeting -- montgomery won't come see marshall, so september 10, 1944 -- i mean, sorry, montgomery won't meet ike. so ike knews up to brussels. he can't get off the plane because he's wrenched his knee, so montgomery comes to see him. pulls out some memorandum can, well, they're sheer rubbish. eventually eisenhower says, steady there, monty, i'm your boss. it's fascinating to me how that difficult rel
of central europe. they have a map of the park benches and a fire hydrant. we did not have a map. do your best, he said. i looked up and my brother was an enlisted man in the army and he said, whatever you do as a second lieutenant, don't show indecision. just make in order and make a decision and move with it. so i grabbed my driver and radio operator in a looked out across one of president eisenhower's new interstates going alongside it and i saw phillips 66 gas station. there is the rest of the story. i grabbed him and went over and walked in full battle gear, gas mask, pistol and everything else up into this midnight on the midnight shift filling station operator. can i have a map of? you know, when the shows an edge of memphis appear? he jumped off of his stool, scattered around behind the counter and gave me a map and out the door i went. that was preparation number one. we did at least have the map and the lead jeep for 640 military policeman, 140 vehicles, the driver and elite jeep and the lieutenant have a map. crossing into the base, i notice that there was a shore patrolman wor
off than those who had to work in the fields but i think that is a debatable subject. if europe fields laid you put in a grueling 14 hours a day but after work the night was your own. a house servant like paul jennings could be called upon any time to service those in the big house. of course for jennings the most galling part of it was when he had to go back to washington with dolley leaving his wife and children behind and after his wife died these are motherless children. i think that was his final motivating factor to say now, not later. yes, sir. >> one thing i noticed about your book is it seems to tie historical parks that don't appear to be related. the rescue of the great painting of george washington. it has occurred to me for a long time that by stating that in addition to the fact that it is a great work, it would have retarded what later became the arc of u.s./british reconciliation. that is not the purpose of your book but has that occurred to you? it has occurred to me for some time. >> they will indeed have enjoyed defiling the image of the father of our country. >> may
breakthroughs of the enlightenment both in europe and in scotland and apply them in many ways to american politics. self-government was only going to work in jefferson's mind if the people who were governing themselves knew themselves, cared about each other -- because why would you sacrifice for someone with whom you had no common interest, and you would find that your individual rights, your individual being had come from nature or from god and, therefore, could not be taken away by the hand of a king or the hands of a mob. and this is the moment he defines, he embodies. it's a remarkable moment. it was blissed to be alive in that very hour, humanly important. so here you have jefferson who can kill a fly when he needs to and can think in the most fundamental, far-reaching ways when he needs to. one hell of a combination. one hell of a combination. what i wanted to do in revisiting jefferson, obviously, was try to restore him to his context as a politician. partly because i think politics gets too bad a rap these days. it may deserve a semi-bad rap. i don't want to be overly optimistic
, including the religion of europe which we are talking about designating and recognizing the fact that there are some things called intangible heritage of the world. societies which have no rich culture did not thereby like the civilization and this is a policy which now unesco formally utterly appears to promote in his recognition and designation of a number of formally cultural aspects. the second one is of course the exponential increase in exchanges, cultural exchanges between the african world for incense and the european world. reparations. two may reparations are a truth. i have addressed the world bank and looking at reparations once and for all. why don't we get together and restore, return all of the artifacts from african continent and forget -- just returned everything. [applause] what bothers me about some of the exponents of reparations approach that they take is once you launch a new topic, once you launch it in public discourse you prepare for the ramifications of whatever position it is. you cannot align yourself and cannot pretend, in other words just try and sil
in europe. she posted 700 pictures of herself, three of them she had beer in her hand or one in her hand and innocent photos. she is on a tour of a guinness factory and she lost her job as a teacher. you think that your 18-year-old or 21 or older child or grandchild can just take down a facebook page when they go job hunting, there is a company, social intelligence inc., which saves the last seven years of facebook pages. so then it becomes available to their employer when they are 22 years old. that, we have heard about. when i started doing research, i had no idea there was this whole other aspect, which was that what you do on the web is followed by data miners. i am a writer. i love i've written books, but it puts 200 tracking mechanisms on your computer to follow where you go. google makes $36 billion a year, 90% of its income, from selling information. what does that mean? me that i look of a medical condition that health insurers can get that information and use it to discriminate. even the advertisements aren't innocent. when young people say they are going to com
. >> they were comfortable, yes. >> what inspired rob cox two, six months before, go off to europe? >> well, this is one of the questions that fascinate me when i started researching the book. he was an idealistic young man. i knew that. he went to a school that, a christian school, and he was somewhat religious and felt that life was meant to be at more than just yourself, and to have meaning and be helpful to others, that kind of thing. there were a few less noble motivations i think. he was graduated from college. he had no other obvious plan, and yet what we would now call a low draft number. he knew that it was a good chance you'll be drafted drafted into the american army, which had resumed the draft in come at the end of 1940. but had no clear plans to actually go to war, and he wasn't too excited i don't think about spending the next couple of years training for military. so he was casting around for something, and i think this fulfill a lot of meaningful, fulfilled a lot of meaningful goals for him. >> how did he get from harvard to england? i mean, who did he contact? >> that's a
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 89